Advertisement

The Real Challenge: Lessons From Obstetric Nursing History

      The successes, failures, and ongoing dilemmas within nursing derive directly from the earliest nursing practices. The conflicting requirements between strictly prescribed scientific medical treatment and the nurturing care needed by mothers and infants have shaped the practice of obstetric nursing throughout the past century. The historical challenge, relevant to current practice, is that nurses not become so focused on techniques and routines that they forget the patients' needs for comfort and support.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment
      AWHONN Member Login
      AWHONN Members, full access to the journal is a member benefit. Use your society credentials to access all journal content and features
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      REFERENCES

        • Adkins L.
        The care of an obstetrical patient.
        American Journal of Nursing. 1903; 3: 709-711
        • Anderson S.
        Childbirth as a pathological process: An American perspective.
        Maternal Child Nursing. 1977; 2: 240-244
        • Bankert M.
        Watchful care: A history of America’s nurse anesthetists.
        Continuum Press, New York1989
        • Bellevue Hospital Training School for Nurses
        A manual of nursing.
        Bellevue Hospital, New York1878
        • Benner P.
        From novice to expert.
        Addison-Wesley, Menlo Park, CA1984
        • Boice M.
        • Newby F.
        Care for the obstetric patient.
        American Journal of Nursing. 1942; 42: 640-642
        • Bower S.
        The obstetrical nurse.
        American Journal of Nursing. 1915; 15: 734-736
        • Connecticut Training School for Nurses
        A handbook of nursing for family and general use.
        Connecticut Training School, New Haven1878
        • DeLee J.
        Obstetrics for nurses.
        2nd ed. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia1907
        • DeLee J.
        The Chicago Lying-In Hospital and Dispensary.
        The Modern Hospital. 1915; 4: 383-392
        • DeLee J.
        Obstetrics for nurses.
        5th ed. W.B. Saunders, Philadelphia1919
        • DeWitt K.
        Private duty nursing.
        2nd ed. Lippincott, Philadelphia1917
        • Dublin L.
        Mortality among women from causes incidental to childbearing.
        American Journal of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children. 1918; 78: 20-37
        • Fry H.
        Obstetrical emergencies.
        American Journal of Nursing. 1901; 1: 107-111
        • Gordon P.
        • Johnson B.
        Technology and family- centered perinatal care: Conflict or synergy?.
        JOGNN. 1999; 28: 401-408
        • Hall C.
        Training the obstetric nurse.
        American Journal of Nursing. 1927; 27: 373-379
        • Hampton I.
        Nursing: Its principles and practice for hospital and private use.
        Koeckert Publishers, Cleveland1898
        • Hampton I.
        Nursing ethics.
        Koeckert Publisher, Cleveland1900
        • Jordan B.
        Birth in four cultures.
        4th ed. Waveland Press, Prospect Heights, IL1993
        • Keith M.
        Preliminaries of obstetric nursing.
        American Journal of Nursing. 1901; 1: 257-259
        • Landry K.
        • Kilpatrick D.
        Why shave a mother before she gives birth?.
        Maternal Child Nursing. 1977; 2: 189-190
        • Leavitt J.
        Brought to bed: Childbearing in America 1750–1950.
        Oxford University Press, New York1986
        • Leavitt J.
        Strange young women on errands: Obstetric nursing between two worlds.
        Nursing History Review. 1998; 6: 3-24
        • Lewis H.
        Obstetrical technique in the Cook County Hospital.
        Surgery, Gynecology, and Obstetrics. 1906; 2: 81-86
        • Loudon I.
        Maternal mortality: 1880–1950: Some regional and international comparisons.
        The Society for the History of Medicine. 1988; 1: 183-228
        • McCullough M.
        A normal home delivery.
        Trained Nurse and Hospital Review. 1939; 102: 419-424
        • McNiven P.
        • Hodnett E.
        • Obrien-Pallas L.
        Supporting women in labor: A work sampling study of the activities of labor and delivery nurses.
        Birth. 1992; 19: 3-9
        • National Center for Health Statistics
        Health: United States 1993.
        Division of Vital Statistics, Hyattsville, MD1993
        • Nightingale F.
        Sick nursing and health nursing.
        in: Billings J. Hurd H. Hospitals, dispensaries, and nursing. The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore1894: 24-42
        • Pope G.
        Obstetric nursing.
        in: Billings J. Hurd H. Hospitals, dispensaries, and nursing. The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore1894: 164-171
        • Roberts J.
        Maternal positions for childbirth: A historical review of nursing care practices.
        Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and Neonatal Nursing. 1979; 8: 24-32
        • Rosenberg C.
        The care of strangers.
        Basic Books, New York1987
        • Stowe H.
        The specially trained obstetric nurse—her advantages and her field.
        American Journal of Nursing. 1910; 10: 550-554
        • Taylor E.
        Of what is the nature of nursing?.
        American Journal of Nursing. 1934; 34: 473-476
        • Vogel M.
        The invention of the modern hospital, 1870–1930.
        University of Chicago Press, Chicago1980
        • Warren S.
        Technique of labor in private practice.
        American Journal of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children. 1902; 45: 26-39
        • Weeks C.
        A textbook of nursing for the use of training schools, families, and private students.
        Appleton, New York1885
        • Weeks-Shaw C.
        A textbook of nursing.
        Appleton, New York1912
        • Wiebe R.
        The search for order: 1877–1920.
        Hill and Wang, New York1967