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Consensus Bundle on Maternal Mental Health: Perinatal Depression and Anxiety

Published:February 09, 2017DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jogn.2017.01.001

      Abstract

      Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health conditions encountered by women of reproductive age. When left untreated, perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have profound adverse effects on women and their children, ranging from increased risk of poor adherence to medical care, exacerbation of medical conditions, loss of interpersonal and financial resources, smoking and substance use, suicide, and infanticide. Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders are associated with increased risks of maternal and infant mortality and morbidity and are recognized as a significant patient safety issue. In 2015, the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care convened an interdisciplinary workgroup to develop an evidence-based patient safety bundle to address maternal mental health. The focus of this bundle is perinatal mood and anxiety disorders. The bundle is modeled after other bundles released by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care and provides broad direction for incorporating perinatal mood and anxiety disorder screening, intervention, referral, and follow-up into maternity care practice across health care settings. This commentary provides information to assist with bundle implementation.
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      Biography

      Susan Kendig, JD, MSN, is the Director of Policy, National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health, St. Louis, MO.

      Biography

      John P. Keats, MD, CPE, is a hospitalist, Anne Arundel Medical Center, Annapolis, MD.

      Biography

      M. Camille Hoffman, MD, MSCS, is an assistant professor of maternal fetal medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, CO.

      Biography

      Lisa B. Kay, MSW, MBA, is a client service representative, Cigna Health Insurance, Lutherville Timonium, MD.

      Biography

      Emily S. Miller, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

      Biography

      Tiffany A. Moore Simas, MD, MPH, is an associate professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School/UMass Memorial Health Care, Worcester, MA.

      Biography

      Ariela Frieder, MD, is a psychiatrist, Zucker Hillside Hospital–Northwell Health Physician Partners, Glen Oaks, NY.

      Biography

      Barbara Hackley, PhD, CNM, is the Clinical Director of Women's Health Services and Director of the Resiliency Initiative, Montefiore South Bronx Health Center, Bronx, NY.

      Biography

      Pec Indman, EdD, MFT, is the Director of Women's Health, Regroup Therapy and the author of Beyond the Blues: Understanding and Treating Prenatal and Postpartum Depression & Anxiety, San Jose, CA.

      Biography

      Christena Raines, MSN, RN, is the Associate Director, Obstetrical Liaison and Community Outreach University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.

      Biography

      Kisha Semenuk, MSN, RN, is a program manager for Alliance for Innovation in Maternal Health, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

      Biography

      Katherine L. Wisner, MD, MS, is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and obstetrics and gynecology in the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

      Biography

      Lauren A. Lemieux, BS, is a program manager, Strategic Health Care Initiatives, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.

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