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AWHONN Practice Briefs

  • Maternal and Newborn Safety During the Administration of Brexanolone: AWHONN Practice Brief Number 10

    • Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses
    Published online: October 14, 2020
    p620-621
    Standardized protocols that address staffing and the safety of the mother and newborn or infant should be implemented at all facilities at which brexanolone is administered to treat severe postpartum depression (PPD).
  • Lower Extremity Nerve Injury in Childbirth: AWHONN Practice Brief Number 11

    • Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses
    Published online: October 19, 2020
    p622-624
    Lower extremity nerve injury occurs when nerves are compressed or stretched. Duration and intensity of the pressure and/or stretch affect the extent of nerve damage (Bunch & Hope, 2014). These injuries are uncommon, but their effect on women after birth can be devastating. Symptoms vary based on the affected nerve and may include numbness, paresthesia, pain, and loss of muscle function that causes an inability to bear weight or walk. Impairments can be unilateral or bilateral. Lower extremity nerve injury generally resolves within 2 to 6 months, although symptoms may persist for years or be permanent (Haller et al., 2017; O’Neal et al., 2015; Tournier et al., 2019).

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    Online Supplement

    • Immunization for Pregnant Women: A Call to Action

      • from the American Academy of Family Physicians; American College of Nurse-Midwives; American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; and Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses,
      • John Cullen,
      • Susan Stone,
      • Maureen G. Phipps,
      • Rebecca Cypher
      Published in issue: November 2020
      e1-e6
      Immunizations are an essential part of prenatal care, offering critical protection to women and their fetuses against potentially deadly diseases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends that women who are pregnant receive an inactivated influenza and a tetanus/diphtheria/acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine in every pregnancy (1). The American Academy of Family Physicians; American College of Nurse-Midwives; American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists; and Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses strongly support this recommendation.
      Online Only
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